SheevaPlug

Goodbye inDefero

Sunday, 10 December 2023
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

And thanks for all ! This week, I decided to replace my old software forge inDefero by a Gitea instance. inDefero project was started in 2008 by Loïc d'Anterroches after Google decided to stop GoogleCode. Unfortunately, it was discontinued some years after because Loïc was almost alone to develop it and don't earn enough money with it (even with a SaaS/pay option). Plus, when you do the same things for a long time, and not necessary related to your core studies, you want to do something else. Written in PHP5, it has a lot of features :

  • Multi CVS support : SVN, mercurial, git, monotone
  • Tickets
  • Code review
  • Wiki
  • Full Open Source
  • Nice design

It's fast and extensible, can be run on a low power server. This is why I really, really thanks Loïc for his hard work. More than ten years after, I still can run it (with some patches) !

Nevertheless, web technologies evolve too fast and I don't want to run PHP5 anymore (nor create a container for it). I wanted something light & fast, something I can hack, something nice for the eyes. After looking on all available forges, I decided to test Gitea. I don't know Go programming language, so I can't patch it, but I was really impressed to see how fast it is (on a low power server). Concerning UI, it's a clone of Github, but it's almost the case for all competitors... Not really nice or innovative, but it's okay. The funny fact is that I can't compile it by myself because it take too much memory... Fortunately, the precompiled binary works like a charm !

Why not Github (or other online forge) ? More than code hosting, Github offers a community. It has become the reference for all developpers (you can even run your own company instance !). I'm pretty sure I would get more contributions to my projets if I put them on it. From a technical point of view, it works very well and offer all you need (except project management). So, the reason to not choose an external forge is more a philosophical decision : it's better to keep your projects/data in your own home more than elsewhere, to have a full control on it (ok, git is by design a distributed software). It's the same for the blog in comparison of Facebook/Instagram/Whatever... Sure, it's less fast, can have some downtime and I had to take care on backups and administration by myself. It's the price of freedom.

The new address for my projects is more generic : forge.soutade.fr. I tried to map old inDefero URLs to redirect in the new one, but didn't migrate tickets & user accounts (sorry everybody).

Tip: Fight against SPAM in comments

Sunday, 29 October 2023
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

What a surprise when you manage a server and see in the morning your mailbox full of mails telling there is an issue ! It starts like a bad day... First thing : connect to the server and blacklist the attacker IP. This one was not from China or Russia, but from Germany ! It tries to do code and SQL injection on all web pages, with a delay between each bunch of requests to remain undercover. Fortunately, all dynamic web pages in my server are behind a login form. Public part use only statically generated HTML pages. This is done by my static blog generator Dynastie. It's a 10 years old project written in Python/Django. If I have to write it again, I would use Python templates and not XML, but this one has been especially written for my needs and perfectly fit it. So, even if the IHM is very basic, the rendering is aux petits oignons.

One of great feature (not available in other static generators), except dynamic post management, is dynamic comment support. Unfortunately, a website offering public comments without registration is a target for spammers. My automatic comment filtering works well since 2014, but has been bypassed this week. Here is how I fixed it.

As robot doesn't load CSS and JavaScript resources, we can play with hidden fields in the comment's form and do checks on webserver side. So, I added an hidden field which is filled by Javascript when user press on "Comment" button. Value set is a timestamp + a magic number that is then checked by server. So, if the spammer doesn't run Javascript, it'll be blocked ! For sure, this trick is very easy to break and a spammer can easily bypass it with a smart/targeted robot or by doing manual SPAM. In this case, the only solutions is a complex captcha/registration and/or manual comment validation. But it requires more complex modules and work from both parts (user and webmaster), which is overkill for small a website.

Gandi (no) bullshit

Sunday, 02 July 2023
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Gandi est un acteur bien connu en France pour son activité de "Gestionnaire de nom de domaine" (registrar en Anglais). Enfin, tout du moins par les profils techniques qui cherchent à gérer leurs noms de domaine ! La réputation de la société (fondée en 2000) s'est bâtie sur sa devise "no bullshit" : l'offre commerciale n'est pas la plus avantageuse, mais derrière l'on retrouve des équipes solides techniquement avec un sens éthique développé (de nombreux organismes à but non lucratif sont sponsorisés). Pour se diversifier, ils ont étendus au fil des années leur offre avec des certificats SSL, ainsi que des hébergement virtuels et physiques.

Malheureusement en 2019, Gandi se fait racheter par un fond de capital-investissement (Montefiore Investissements). Il y a une première vague de départs de la part des clients, alors qu'aucune annonce concrète n'est faite (mais parce-que l'on sait tous comment ça va se finir). En 2023, après quatre années stables, nouveau bouleversement avec la fusion entre Gandi et le groupe Néerlandais Total Webhosting Solutions (TWS) pour former Your.Online. Suite à cette fusion, l'ensemble des clients a eu la surprise de découvrir une augmentation générale des tarifs, ainsi que la partie mail va devenir payante (4€ HT/mois/boîte pour l'offre de base). On peut comprendre une augmentation des tarifs vu de l'inflation actuelle (minime pour un .fr (< 0.5€HT/an)). Mais, ne plus avoir ne serait-ce qu'une adresse mail associée à son nom de domaine (qui est une pratique courante dans le milieu) est rédhibitoire pour beaucoup de personnes. Il y a clairement une recherche maximale de rentabilité au détriment des clients et de l'éthique. Tout du moins de la part de la direction, les équipes techniques devant se contenter de suivre.

Pour ma part, je vais encore rester chez Gandi, car leur solution technique tient la route et que je n'utilisais le mail que comme "relai" pour émettre mon courrier (et ne pas tomber dans les filtres anti-spams), gérant moi-même mes serveurs mails. Néanmoins, je dois configurer une nouvelle entrée "PTR" dans le DNS (qui n'est autre qu'un DNS inversé), notamment requis par Gmail. J'en profite donc pour mettre mon script à jour. Si ça ne tient pas sur le long terme, j'utiliserai de nouveau un relai, notamment via Proton Mail qui a l'air fort sympathique.

Le script est disponible ici

#!/usr/bin/env python3
#-*- encoding: utf-8 -*-

# This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
# (at your option) any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

import requests
import json
import re
import socket
import ipaddress

# Config
domain="soutade.fr"
API_KEY = "MY_API_KEY"
livedns_api = "https://dns.api.gandi.net/api/v5/"
dyndns_url = 'http://checkip.dyndns.com/'
headers = {
    'X-Api-Key': API_KEY,
}
A_RECORD_NAME="@" # Target record to update

# https://www.programcreek.com/python/?CodeExample=get+local+address
def get_ipv6():
    s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET6, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
    s.connect(('2001:4860:4860::8888', 1))
    return s.getsockname()[0]

def get_ipv4():
    response = requests.get(dyndns_url)
    if response.ok:
        pattern = re.compile('[^:]*(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)')
        result = pattern.search(response.text, 0)
        if result == None:
            print("No IP found")
            exit(1) 
        else:
            return result.group(0).strip()
    # Bad gateway
    elif response.status_code in (502,504):
        exit(0)
    else:
        print("Connexion error")
        response.raise_for_status()
        exit(1)

def update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, target, value):
    # Get recorded IP
    response = requests.get(f'{domain_records_href}/{A_RECORD_NAME}/{target}', headers=headers)

    if (response.ok):
        record = response.json()
    else:
        print("Failed to look for recorded IP")
        if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
            response.raise_for_status()
        exit(1)

    if value != record['rrset_values'][0]:
        record['rrset_values'][0] = value

        print(f'URL {domain_records_href}/{A_RECORD_NAME}/{target}')

        # PUT new IP
        response = requests.put(f'{domain_records_href}/{A_RECORD_NAME}/{target}',
                                headers=headers, json=record)

        if (response.ok):
            print("IP updated")
        else:
            print("something went wrong")
            if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
                response.raise_for_status()
            exit(1)

        return 34 # IP updated return !!

    return 0

def create_gandi_record(domain_records_href, name, _type, value):
    request = {
        'rrset_name':name,
        'rrset_type': _type,
        'rrset_values': [value],
        'rrset_ttl': 300
        }

    response = requests.post(f'{domain_records_href}', headers=headers, json=request)

    if response.status_code == 201:
        return 0
    else:
        print(response)
        return 1

def delete_gandi_records(domain_records_href, _type):
    response = requests.get(f'{domain_records_href}?rrset_type={_type}', headers=headers)

    if (response.ok):
        json_resp = response.json()
        for record in json_resp:
            requests.delete(record['rrset_href'], headers=headers)
        return 0
    else:
        print(response)
        return 1

# Get current IP
current_ip_v4 = get_ipv4()
print(f'Your Current IP is {current_ip_v4}')

# Retrieve domains address
response = requests.get(livedns_api + "domains", headers=headers)
if (response.ok):
    domains = response.json()
else:
    if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
        response.raise_for_status()
    exit(1)

domain_index = next((index for (index, d) in enumerate(domains) if d["fqdn"] == domain), None)

if domain_index == None:
    # domain not found
    print("The requested domain {domain} was not found in this gandi account")
    exit(1)

domain_records_href = domains[domain_index]["domain_records_href"]
ret = update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, 'A', current_ip_v4)

current_ip_v6 = get_ipv6()
print(f'Your Current IP is {current_ip_v6}')

domain_records_href = domains[domain_index]["domain_records_href"]
ret |= update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, 'AAAA', current_ip_v6)

if ret == 34:
    # Delete all PTR records
    delete_gandi_records(domain_records_href, 'PTR')

    # Update PTR v4
    reverse_ip = '.'.join(current_ip_v4.split('.')[::-1])
    ptr_ip = f'{reverse_ip}.in-addr.arpa'
    create_gandi_record(domain_records_href, ptr_ip, 'PTR', f'{domain}.')

    # Update PTR v6
    full_ip = ipaddress.ip_address(current_ip_v6).exploded
    reverse_ip = '.'.join(full_ip.replace(':', '')[::-1])
    ptr_ip = f'{reverse_ip}.in-addr.arpa'
    create_gandi_record(domain_records_href, ptr_ip, 'PTR', f'{domain}.')

exit(ret)

L'IPv6 est arrivée !

Monday, 17 April 2023
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Il y a quelques jours, j'ai eu une coupure d'Internet d'environ 5h... De quoi râler auprès de son opérateur ! Perturbation générale de tous les clients. Il vaut mieux que soit ainsi plutôt qu'un incident isolé, potentiellement long à résoudre. Une fois Internet reconnecté, quel plaisir de voir dans l'interface de la box une adresse IPv6 ! Après quelques soucis de configuration réseau, tous les services sont désormais joignables via cet adressage !

Qu'est-ce qu'IPv6 ?

C'est une bonne question, car en général on veut simplement que notre connexion internet fonctionne sans avoir à tripatouiller les tréfonds de la configuration réseau. IPv6 est le "successeur" d'IPv4. Il a été spécifié en 1998 et normalisé en 2017. L'objectif est de dépasser les limitations actuelles des fameuses adresses "IP" (Internet Protocol). Cette adresse est attribuée de façon statique (toujours la même) ou dynamique aux appareils qui se connectent à un réseau ethernet (dont Internet). Elle permet le routage du trafic réseau. Au quotidien, nous ne manipulons pas directement ces adresses, mais plutôt des identifiants textuels (l'adresse d'un site web) pour naviguer. Ces identifiants sont traduits automatiquement en adresses IP par les serveurs DNS (Domain Name Server). La gestion mondiale des adresses est confiée à la société américaine (à but non lucratif) IANA qui dépend de l'ICANN (américaine également). Elle est chargée d'attribuer des blocs d'adresses IP à différents registres régionaux (1 par continent), qui attribuent eux même des sous-ensembles aux registres locaux (la plupart du temps des opérateurs télécom), attribuant individuellement (à leurs clients) une ou plusieurs adresses.

Les adresses IPv4 sont constituées de 4 octets (32 bits), chaque octet ayant une valeur comprise entre 0 et 255 (exemple : 205.196.32.55). Le nombre d'adresses total est donc de ~4 milliards. Cela peut paraître énorme, mais aujourd'hui où tout le monde a un ou plusieurs appareils connectés en même temps, on arrive vite à saturation. Surtout qu'il faut également compter les adresses nécessaires pour les serveurs (web) et les objets connectés. Les adresses IPv6 sont elles composées de 8 octets (128 bits), amenant ainsi le nombre total à plus de 340 sextillions (ou 34 * 10^37). Elles ont une notation différente, utilisant l'hexadécimal en séparant les blocs de deux octets par ":" (exemple : 2003:e8:2705:ac00:15a5:4e85:fe11:47a3). Pour améliorer la lisibilité, on utilise une forme compressée où les 0 en tête sont supprimés (au niveau du second bloc e8 par exemple). On peut également fusionner tous les blocs avec des 0 consécutifs, comme sur cet exemple : 2a02:4780:12::28 qui correspond en réalité à 2a02:4780:0012:000:0000:0000:0000:0028. Malgré cette version condensée, elles restent pourtant beaucoup moins lisibles.

Alors pourquoi ne pas avoir basculé plus tôt ? Le matériel est compatible depuis de nombreuses années, néanmoins IPv6 n'est pas qu'une simple augmentation de la taille des adresses. La norme apporte également des fonctionnalités complexes à implémenter (cf la coupure réseau !). D'autant plus qu'il faut faire cohabiter les deux piles réseau sur un même système durant la phase de transition. Mais, face à la pénurie mondiale d'IPv4 et la pression des institutions, les opérateurs n'ont d'autres choix que de migrer (progressivement). D'après mes premières statistiques (1/2 mois), il y a environ 20% de connexions utilisant IPv6.

IPv6 sur une box Bouygues Telecom (sagem F@st5330b)

Par défaut, le trafic IPv6 entrant est bloqué par le routeur et ce, même si le pare-feu est désactivé. C'est une bonne mesure de protection, mais qui pourra poser problème quand on souhaite exposer des services sur le web. Voici la procédure complète pour ouvrir les ports pour un serveur GNU/Linux (on pourra également passer en politique "faible" pour tout exposer sur toutes les machines, mais cela reste dangereux) :

  1. Désactiver la délégation de préfixe sur la box
  2. Activer le DHCPv6 sur son interface réseau (ici eth0), il faut ajouter une ligne au fichier /etc/network/interfaces :

    iface eth0 inet6 dhcp

  3. Redémarrer le serveur ou uniquement la partie réseau

    sudo service networking restart

  4. Attribuer une IP statique au serveur (n'est actuellement pas pris en compte)

  5. Récupérer la nouvelle adresse

    sudo dhclient -6 eth0

  6. Vérifier que l'IPv6 du serveur correspond à celle de la configuration de la box

    sudo ip a

  7. Ajouter des règles de pare-feu pour tous les services à exposer (utiliser la fonctionnalité "dupliquer" pour aller plus vite)

  8. Configurer le serveur DNS en ajoutant une règle AAAA
  9. (Optionnel) Tester les règles via ce site

Mise à jour automatique du DNS Gandi

C'est un script que j'utilise depuis 5 ans. Le voici mis à jour pour supporter IPv6. Il est disponible ici

#!/usr/bin/env python3
#-*- encoding: utf-8 -*-
# This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
# (at your option) any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

import requests
import json
import re
import socket

# Config
domain="soutade.fr"
API_KEY = "YOUR-KEY"
livedns_api = "https://dns.api.gandi.net/api/v5/"
dyndns_url = 'http://checkip.dyndns.com/'
headers = {
    'X-Api-Key': API_KEY,
}

A_RECORD_NAME="@" # Record of A type

def get_ipv6():
    s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET6, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
    # DNS Google
    s.connect(('2001:4860:4860::8888', 1))
    return s.getsockname()[0]

def get_ipv4():
    response = requests.get(dyndns_url)
    if response.ok:
        pattern = re.compile('[^:]*(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)')
        result = pattern.search(response.text, 0)
        if result == None:
            print("No IP found")
            exit(1) 
        else:
            return result.group(0).strip()
    # Bad gateway
    elif response.status_code in (502,504):
        exit(0)
    else:
        print("Connexion error")
        response.raise_for_status()
        exit(1)

def update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, target, current_ip):
    # Get recorded IP
    response = requests.get(f'{domain_records_href}/{A_RECORD_NAME}/{target}', headers=headers)

    if (response.ok):
        record = response.json()
    else:
        print("Failed to look for recorded IP")
        if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
            response.raise_for_status()
        exit(1)

    print('Old IP : %s' % (record['rrset_values'][0]))

    if current_ip != record['rrset_values'][0]:
        record['rrset_values'][0] = current_ip

        # PUT new IP
        response = requests.put(f'{domain_records_href}/{A_RECORD_NAME}/{target}',
                                headers=headers, json=record)

        if (response.ok):
            print("IP updated")
        else:
            print("something went wrong")
            if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
                response.raise_for_status()
            exit(1)

        return 34 # IP updated return !!
    return 0


# Get current IP
current_ip = get_ipv4()
print(f'Your Current IP is {current_ip}')

# Retrieve domains address
response = requests.get(livedns_api + "domains", headers=headers)
if (response.ok):
    domains = response.json()
else:
    if response.status_code != 502: # Bad gateway
        response.raise_for_status()
    exit(1)

domain_index = next((index for (index, d) in enumerate(domains) if d["fqdn"] == domain), None)

if domain_index == None:
    # domain not found
    print("The requested domain {domain} was not found in this gandi account")
    exit(1)

domain_records_href = domains[domain_index]["domain_records_href"]
ret = update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, 'A', current_ip)

current_ip = get_ipv6()
print(f'Your Current IP is {current_ip}')
domain_records_href = domains[domain_index]["domain_records_href"]
ret |= update_gandi_record(domain_records_href, 'AAAA', current_ip)

exit(ret)

IWLA 0.6

Sunday, 20 November 2022
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Capture d'écran IWLA

Almost 3 years since the last news about IWLA. It does not really reflect the continuous development & maintenance of this wonderful tool. But don't worry, version 0.6 is now out ! The main change is the complete move from Python 2 to Python 3, but we may also mention :

  • Users requests are no more saved (except if keep_requests is set) which allow to save a LOT of space
  • A favicon is available
  • Fresh synchronization with AWSTATS data
  • Users need to do at least one hit per viewed page to not be marked as a robot
  • Feed detector has been enhanced
  • Track users plugin has been replaced by filter users which allows to define complex filters
  • Users can be enlighted in all visits page
  • IP can be anonymized (for public statistics)

The full ChangeLog is available here

While working on it, I realized how we can easily extend it. It's a real pleasure comparing to so big one PERL file code of AWSTATS, plus having it modular allows to implement our own rules which makes statistics really more precise. The only issue compared to AWSTATS is that IWLA is only focused on web statistics, but it has been design for it, not for everything related to log parsing !

New : A demo instance (for indefero.soutade.fr) is available here

I also decided to give up the old style branching model with master and dev. Using git and its lightweight branches, it's better to have a model with tags for stable releases and features branch for development. Code is not often updated and it makes no sense to have a master branch updated every 3 years with only one merge commit while dev is living.

I recently had look on concurrence, especially with Matomo and I was really afraid to see how users are tracked ! Everything is managed from pages viewed to cursor moves, user system information retrieval, time spent... All of this generate extra traffic and requires to execute Javascript code to obtain a lot of information about users's environment. But it's not the worst tool as it doesn't use commercial tracking (like Google Analytics) and keep data on webmaster's server and it's certified RGPD compliant. Commercial trackers are really a nightmare for consumer's privacy. Using it, webmaster can obtain really good statistics, but everything is stored on (abroad) commercial servers to create your profile ! Your profile is then sold or used to display you personalized advertising. Unfortunately, almost all websites are using them. In opposite, IWLA requires no cookies, no Javascript, no awful banner. It only parse and analyze log requests from webserver and generate a static HTML report which is the only right way to do !