Informatique
Monday, 25 July 2016
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Do It Yourself, make your own objects, this is in vogue. Since the first version RaspberryPI, we can see a lot of little boards with GPIO connections that handles basic sensors/connectors. Even if some prefer to use wireless communications to communicate with these little devices, USB is still there !

Today I'll show an example of a basic raw bulk USB communication. We could setup our device with the serial line gadget (/dev/ttyGS0), but if you need performance or you want to handle specific USB feature, it's interesting to use raw transfers. Plus, all of this is done in userspace thanks to GadgetFS.

I waste a lot of time due to a buggy USB driver (dwc2), but, finally, the right code is simple.

1. USB keywords

All technical details about USB can be found within usb.org or linux-usb.org, it's quite heavy. Basically, USB communication use a master/slave schema : host side (mainly a PC) sends requests to device side (device). Device never asks questions, it only replies.

Configuration of USB port can be static (host or device) or dynamic. This is the case for DRD (Dual Role Device) configurations, which was previously called OTG (On The Go : who is the first to talk ?).

On the device, we have endpoints grouped into interfaces. Each endpoint contains a hardware buffer (memory) to deal with requests. An endpoint is setup (hardcoded) to be in or out, meaning, it can do only "in" or "out" operation.

In addition to direction, the type of endpoint is important (it's assigned during endpoint configuration). It can be :

  • control for configuration/control requests
  • bulk for bulk transfers
  • isochronous for periodic transfers with a reserved bandwidth
  • int for transfers by interruption

A special endpoint called ep0 (the first one) is always present. It's an in and out endpoint with control attribute. It allows to read/write configuration of other endpoints.

All these information are described in descriptors. You can look at them with

lsusb -v

The low level command sent to controller is called an URB (USB Request Block).

A picture to sum up :

USB host/device schema

2. Enable and mount GadgetFS

First thing to do is to enable GadgetFS in the kernel you're running (if it's not already the case).

Run make menuconfig [ARCH=XXX] in the kernel build directory. Then, enable

Device Drivers -> USB support -> USB Gadget Support -> USB Gadget Drivers -> Gadget Filesystem

In the same section (or in the section above depending on your controller), select the right Peripheral Controller.

You can now rebuild your Linux kernel.

Once booted, mount GadgetFS (in /dev for example)

mkdir /dev/gadget
mount -t gadgetfs gadgetfs /dev/gadget

3. Device side

There is a reference code that can be found in linux-usb.org which manage everything and can use aio for asynchronous requests management. Mine is simpler, full code link can be found in Conclusion part. I'll explain each parts in details.

Let's start. Do includes. usbtring.c is copied from linux-usb.org (strings sent back to host must be encoded in UTF-16). Most of structures and defines are referenced in ch9.h (which corresponds to chapter 9 of the USB norm) and gadgetfs.h

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/select.h>

#include <linux/types.h>
#include <linux/usb/ch9.h>
#include <linux/usb/gadgetfs.h>

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#include <errno.h>

#include "usbstring.c"

Then, defines

#define FETCH(_var_)                            \
    memcpy(cp, &_var_, _var_.bLength);          \
    cp += _var_.bLength;

#define CONFIG_VALUE 2

// Specific to controller
#define USB_DEV "/dev/gadget/dwc2"
#define USB_EPIN "/dev/gadget/ep1in"
#define USB_EPOUT "/dev/gadget/ep2out"

enum {
    STRINGID_MANUFACTURER = 1,
    STRINGID_PRODUCT,
    STRINGID_SERIAL,
    STRINGID_CONFIG_HS,
    STRINGID_CONFIG_LS,
    STRINGID_INTERFACE,
    STRINGID_MAX
};

Config value is the number of endpoints. After that, we have paths relative to GadgetFS. When mounted, there is only USB_DEV, endpoints appears after the first configuration (ep0). Name of endpoints is dependent of the driver implementation.

Structures and static variables :

struct io_thread_args {
    unsigned stop;
    int fd_in, fd_out;
};

static struct io_thread_args thread_args;

static struct usb_string stringtab [] = {
    { STRINGID_MANUFACTURER, "MyOwnGadget", },
    { STRINGID_PRODUCT,      "Custom gadget", },
    { STRINGID_SERIAL,       "0001", },
    { STRINGID_CONFIG_HS,    "High speed configuration", },
    { STRINGID_CONFIG_LS,    "Low speed configuration", },
    { STRINGID_INTERFACE,    "Custom interface", },
    { STRINGID_MAX, NULL},
};

static struct usb_gadget_strings strings = {
    .language = 0x0409, /* en-us */
    .strings = stringtab,
};

static struct usb_endpoint_descriptor ep_descriptor_in;
static struct usb_endpoint_descriptor ep_descriptor_out;

The main thing here is the description of strings inside stringtag that will be parsed by usbstring functions.

int main()
{
    int fd=-1, ret, err=-1;
    uint32_t send_size;
    struct usb_config_descriptor config;
    struct usb_config_descriptor config_hs;
    struct usb_device_descriptor device_descriptor;
    struct usb_interface_descriptor if_descriptor;
    uint8_t init_config[2048];
    uint8_t* cp;

    fd = open(USB_DEV, O_RDWR|O_SYNC);

    if (fd <= 0)
    {
        printf("Unable to open %s (%m)\n", USB_DEV);
        return 1;
    }

    *(uint32_t*)init_config = 0;
    cp = &init_config[4];

    device_descriptor.bLength = USB_DT_DEVICE_SIZE;
    device_descriptor.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_DEVICE;
    device_descriptor.bDeviceClass = USB_CLASS_COMM;
    device_descriptor.bDeviceSubClass = 0;
    device_descriptor.bDeviceProtocol = 0;
    //device_descriptor.bMaxPacketSize0 = 255; Set by driver
    device_descriptor.idVendor = 0xAA; // My own id
    device_descriptor.idProduct = 0xBB; // My own id
    device_descriptor.bcdDevice = 0x0200; // Version
    // Strings
    device_descriptor.iManufacturer = STRINGID_MANUFACTURER;
    device_descriptor.iProduct = STRINGID_PRODUCT;
    device_descriptor.iSerialNumber = STRINGID_SERIAL;
    device_descriptor.bNumConfigurations = 1; // Only one configuration

    ep_descriptor_in.bLength = USB_DT_ENDPOINT_SIZE;
    ep_descriptor_in.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_ENDPOINT;
    ep_descriptor_in.bEndpointAddress = USB_DIR_IN | 1;
    ep_descriptor_in.bmAttributes = USB_ENDPOINT_XFER_BULK;
    ep_descriptor_in.wMaxPacketSize = 512; // HS size

    ep_descriptor_out.bLength = USB_DT_ENDPOINT_SIZE;
    ep_descriptor_out.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_ENDPOINT;
    ep_descriptor_out.bEndpointAddress = USB_DIR_OUT | 2;
    ep_descriptor_out.bmAttributes = USB_ENDPOINT_XFER_BULK;
    ep_descriptor_out.wMaxPacketSize = 512; // HS size

    if_descriptor.bLength = sizeof(if_descriptor);
    if_descriptor.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_INTERFACE;
    if_descriptor.bInterfaceNumber = 0;
    if_descriptor.bAlternateSetting = 0;
    if_descriptor.bNumEndpoints = 2;
    if_descriptor.bInterfaceClass = USB_CLASS_COMM;
    if_descriptor.bInterfaceSubClass = 0;
    if_descriptor.bInterfaceProtocol = 0;
    if_descriptor.iInterface = STRINGID_INTERFACE;

    config_hs.bLength = sizeof(config_hs);
    config_hs.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_CONFIG;
    config_hs.wTotalLength = config_hs.bLength +
        if_descriptor.bLength + ep_descriptor_in.bLength + ep_descriptor_out.bLength;
    config_hs.bNumInterfaces = 1;
    config_hs.bConfigurationValue = CONFIG_VALUE;
    config_hs.iConfiguration = STRINGID_CONFIG_HS;
    config_hs.bmAttributes = USB_CONFIG_ATT_ONE | USB_CONFIG_ATT_SELFPOWER;
    config_hs.bMaxPower = 1;

    config.bLength = sizeof(config);
    config.bDescriptorType = USB_DT_CONFIG;
    config.wTotalLength = config.bLength +
        if_descriptor.bLength + ep_descriptor_in.bLength + ep_descriptor_out.bLength;
    config.bNumInterfaces = 1;
    config.bConfigurationValue = CONFIG_VALUE;
    config.iConfiguration = STRINGID_CONFIG_LS;
    config.bmAttributes = USB_CONFIG_ATT_ONE | USB_CONFIG_ATT_SELFPOWER;
    config.bMaxPower = 1;

    FETCH(config);
    FETCH(if_descriptor);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_in);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_out);

    FETCH(config_hs);
    FETCH(if_descriptor);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_in);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_out);

    FETCH(device_descriptor);

    // Configure ep0
    send_size = (uint32_t)cp-(uint32_t)init_config;
    ret = write(fd, init_config, send_size);

    if (ret != send_size)
    {
        printf("Write error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }

    printf("ep0 configured\n");

    handle_ep0(fd);

end:
    if (fd != -1) close(fd);

    return err;
}

The main function. We build the descriptors and send them to ep0. It's needed to send both low/full speed (USB 1) and high speed (USB 2) configurations. Here, they are quite the same. We have only one interface with two endpoints, one for in, and one for out. Descriptors are sent as a big char array that must starts by an uint32_t tag set to 0. All values are expressed in little endian.

ep0 function :

static void handle_ep0(int fd)
{
    int ret, nevents, i;
    fd_set read_set;
    struct usb_gadgetfs_event events[5];

    while (1)
    {
        FD_ZERO(&read_set);
        FD_SET(fd, &read_set);

        select(fd+1, &read_set, NULL, NULL, NULL);

        ret = read(fd, &events, sizeof(events));

        if (ret < 0)
        {
            printf("Read error %d (%m)\n", ret);
            goto end;        
        }

        nevents = ret / sizeof(events[0]);

        printf("%d event(s)\n", nevents);

        for (i=0; i<nevents; i++)
        {
            switch (events[i].type)
            {
            case GADGETFS_CONNECT:
                printf("EP0 CONNECT\n");
                break;
            case GADGETFS_DISCONNECT:
                printf("EP0 DISCONNECT\n");
                break;
            case GADGETFS_SETUP:
                printf("EP0 SETUP\n");
                handle_setup_request(fd, &events[i].u.setup);
                break;
            case GADGETFS_NOP:
            case GADGETFS_SUSPEND:
                break;
            }
        }
    }

end:
    return;
}

This one receives events and handle them. The most important are setup requests, which are requests that kernel cannot full handle by itself (or notice userspace).

static void handle_setup_request(int fd, struct usb_ctrlrequest* setup)
{
    int status;
    uint8_t buffer[512];
    pthread_t thread;

    printf("Setup request %d\n", setup->bRequest);

    switch (setup->bRequest)
    {
    case USB_REQ_GET_DESCRIPTOR:
        if (setup->bRequestType != USB_DIR_IN)
            goto stall;
        switch (setup->wValue >> 8)
        {
            case USB_DT_STRING:
                printf("Get string id #%d (max length %d)\n", setup->wValue & 0xff,
                    setup->wLength);
                status = usb_gadget_get_string (&strings, setup->wValue & 0xff, buffer);
                // Error 
                if (status < 0)
                {
                    printf("String not found !!\n");
                    break;
                }
                else
                {
                    printf("Found %d bytes\n", status);
                }
                write (fd, buffer, status);
                return;
        default:
            printf("Cannot return descriptor %d\n", (setup->wValue >> 8));
        }
        break;
    case USB_REQ_SET_CONFIGURATION:
        if (setup->bRequestType != USB_DIR_OUT)
        {
            printf("Bad dir\n");
            goto stall;
        }
        switch (setup->wValue) {
        case CONFIG_VALUE:
            printf("Set config value\n");
            if (!thread_args.stop)
            {
                thread_args.stop = 1;
                usleep(200000); // Wait for termination
            }
            if (thread_args.fd_in <= 0)
            {
                status = init_ep (&thread_args.fd_in, &thread_args.fd_out);
            }
            else
                status = 0;
            if (!status)
            {
                thread_args.stop = 0;
                pthread_create(&thread, NULL, io_thread, &thread_args);
            }
            break;
        case 0:
            printf("Disable threads\n");
            thread_args.stop = 1;
            break;
        default:
            printf("Unhandled configuration value %d\n", setup->wValue);
            break;
        }        
        // Just ACK
        status = read (fd, &status, 0);
        return;
    case USB_REQ_GET_INTERFACE:
        printf("GET_INTERFACE\n");
        buffer[0] = 0;
        write (fd, buffer, 1);
        return;
    case USB_REQ_SET_INTERFACE:
        printf("SET_INTERFACE\n");
        ioctl (thread_args.fd_in, GADGETFS_CLEAR_HALT);
        ioctl (thread_args.fd_out, GADGETFS_CLEAR_HALT);
        // ACK
        status = read (fd, &status, 0);
        return;
    }

stall:
    printf("Stalled\n");
    // Error
    if (setup->bRequestType & USB_DIR_IN)
        read (fd, &status, 0);
    else
        write (fd, &status, 0);
}

A bad response within this function can stall the endpoint. Two principle functions are to send back strings (not managed by driver) and starts/stop io_thread().

The init_ep() function is pretty simple. It justs sends endpoint descriptors (in low/full and high speed configuration). Like ep0, it must starts with an uint32_t tag of value 1 :

static int init_ep(int* fd_in, int* fd_out)
{
    uint8_t init_config[2048];
    uint8_t* cp;
    int ret = -1;
    uint32_t send_size;

    // Configure ep1 (low/full speed + high speed)
    *fd_in = open(USB_EPIN, O_RDWR);

    if (*fd_in <= 0)
    {
        printf("Unable to open %s (%m)\n", USB_EPIN);
        goto end;
    }

    *(uint32_t*)init_config = 1;
    cp = &init_config[4];

    FETCH(ep_descriptor_in);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_in);

    send_size = (uint32_t)cp-(uint32_t)init_config;
    ret = write(*fd_in, init_config, send_size);

    if (ret != send_size)
    {
        printf("Write error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }

    printf("ep1 configured\n");

    // Configure ep2 (low/full speed + high speed)
    *fd_out = open(USB_EPOUT, O_RDWR);

    if (*fd_out <= 0)
    {
        printf("Unable to open %s (%m)\n", USB_EPOUT);
        goto end;
    }

    *(uint32_t*)init_config = 1;
    cp = &init_config[4];

    FETCH(ep_descriptor_out);
    FETCH(ep_descriptor_out);

    send_size = (uint32_t)cp-(uint32_t)init_config;
    ret = write(*fd_out, init_config, send_size);

    if (ret != send_size)
    {
        printf("Write error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }

    printf("ep2 configured\n");

    ret = 0;

end:
    return ret;
}

Finally, the io_thread() that responds to host requests. Here, I use select, but it seems not to be handled by driver, I/Os are just blocking, but it could be necessary if we want to stop thread.

/*
 * Respond to host requests
 */
static void* io_thread(void* arg)
{
    struct io_thread_args* thread_args = (struct io_thread_args*)arg;
    fd_set read_set, write_set;
    struct timeval timeout;
    int ret, max_read_fd, max_write_fd;
    char buffer[512];

    max_read_fd = max_write_fd = 0;

    if (thread_args->fd_in > max_write_fd) max_write_fd = thread_args->fd_in;
    if (thread_args->fd_out > max_read_fd) max_read_fd  = thread_args->fd_out;

    while (!thread_args->stop)
    {
        FD_ZERO(&read_set);
        FD_SET(thread_args->fd_out, &read_set);
        timeout.tv_usec = 10000; // 10ms

        memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
        ret = select(max_read_fd+1, &read_set, NULL, NULL, &timeout);

        // Timeout
        if (ret == 0)
            continue;

        // Error
        if (ret < 0)
            break;

        ret = read (thread_args->fd_out, buffer, sizeof(buffer));

        if (ret > 0)
            printf("Read %d bytes : %s\n", ret, buffer);
        else
            printf("Read error %d(%m)\n", ret);

        FD_ZERO(&write_set);
        FD_SET(thread_args->fd_in, &write_set);

        memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
        ret = select(max_write_fd+1, NULL, &write_set, NULL, NULL);

        // Error
        if (ret < 0)
            break;

        strcpy(buffer, "My name is USBond !");

        ret = write (thread_args->fd_in, buffer, strlen(buffer)+1);

        printf("Write status %d (%m)\n", ret);
    }

    close (thread_args->fd_in);
    close (thread_args->fd_out);

    thread_args->fd_in = -1;
    thread_args->fd_out = -1;

    return NULL;
}

4. host side

Host part is very easy to implement. This part can be handled by libusb for a more complete and generic code.

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

#include <linux/usbdevice_fs.h>
#include <linux/usb/ch9.h>

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>

#define USB_DEV "/proc/bus/usb/001/002"

int main()
{
    int fd, ret, err=-1;
    struct usbdevfs_connectinfo connectinfo;
    struct usbdevfs_bulktransfer transfert;
    uint32_t val;
    char buffer[512];

    printf("Build %s @ %s\n", __DATE__, __TIME__);

    fd = open(USB_DEV, O_RDWR);

    if (fd <= 0)
    {
        printf("Unable to open %s (%m)\n", USB_DEV);
        return 1;
    }

    printf("Device opened\n");

    // Optional get information
    ret = ioctl(fd, USBDEVFS_CONNECTINFO, &connectinfo);
    if (ret)
    {
        printf("USBDEVFS_CONNECTINFO error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }

    printf("devnum %d, slow %d\n",
           connectinfo.devnum, connectinfo.slow);

    // Claim interface 0
    val = 0;
    ret = ioctl(fd, USBDEVFS_CLAIMINTERFACE, &val);
    if (ret)
    {
        printf("USBDEVFS_CLAIMINTERFACE error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }
    else
        printf("Interface claimed\n");

    // Send data on ep2out
    strcpy(buffer, "What is your name ?");

    transfert.ep = USB_DIR_OUT + 2;
    transfert.len = strlen(buffer)+1;
    transfert.timeout = 200;
    transfert.data = buffer;

    ret = ioctl(fd, USBDEVFS_BULK, &transfert);
    if (ret < 0)
    {
        printf("USBDEVFS_BULK 1 error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }
    else
        printf("Transfert 1 OK %d\n", ret);

    // Receive data on ep1in
    transfert.ep = USB_DIR_IN + 1;
    transfert.len = sizeof(buffer);
    transfert.timeout = 200;
    transfert.data = buffer;

    ret = ioctl(fd, USBDEVFS_BULK, &transfert);
    if (ret < 0)
    {
        printf("USBDEVFS_BULK 2 error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }
    else
        printf("Transfert 2 OK %d %s\n", ret, buffer);

    // Release interface 0
    val = 0;
    ret = ioctl(fd, USBDEVFS_RELEASEINTERFACE, &val);
    if (ret)
    {
        printf("USBDEVFS_RELEASEINTERFACE error %d (%m)\n", ret);
        goto end;
    }

    printf("Interface released\n");

    err = 0;

end:
    close(fd);

    return err;
}

To start, we claim an interface. This ioctl fully handled in host side driver (nothing is send to device). After that, a simple send/receive protocol. Finally we release interface. be carreful, USB_DEV path change when the device is disconnected.

5. Conclusion

The full code can be found on my server. This basic example can be extended a lot : isochronous, asynch requests, streams (USB 3). Enjoy !

Monday, 04 July 2016
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

This was my problem for Dynastie (a static blog generator). I have a main super class Post and a derived class Draft that directly inherit from the first one.

class Post(models.Model):
    title = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    category = models.ForeignKey(Category, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.SET_NULL)
    creation_date = models.DateTimeField()
    modification_date = models.DateTimeField()
    author = models.ForeignKey(User, null=True, on_delete=models.SET_NULL)
    description = models.TextField(max_length=255, blank=True)
    ...

class Draft(Post):
    pass

A draft is a note that will not be published soon. When it's published, the creation date is reset. Using POO and inheritance, it's quick and easy to model this behavior. Nevertheless, there is one problem. When I do Post.objects.all() I get all Post objects + all Draft objects, which is not what I want !!

The trick to obtain only Post is a mix with Python and Django mechanisms called Managers. Managers are at the top level of QuerySet construction. To solve our problem, we'll override the models.Model attribute objects (which is a models.Manager).

Inside inheritance

To find a solution, we need to know what exactly happens when we do inheritance. The best thing to do, is to inspect the database.

CREATE TABLE "dynastie_post" (
    "id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    "title" varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    "category_id" integer REFERENCES "dynastie_category" ("id"),
    "creation_date" datetime NOT NULL,
    "modification_date" datetime NOT NULL,
    "author_id" integer REFERENCES "auth_user" ("id"),
    "description" text NOT NULL);

CREATE TABLE "dynastie_draft" (
    "post_ptr_id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY REFERENCES "dynastie_post" ("id")
);

We can see that dynastie_draft has a reference to the dynastie_post table. So, doing Post.objects.all() is like writing "SELECT * from dynastie_post" that includes Post part of drafts.

Solution 1 : Without altering base class

The first solution is to create a Manager that will exclude draft id from the request. It has the advantage to keep base class as is, but it's not efficient (especially if there is a lot of child objects).

class PostOnlyManager(models.Manager):
    def get_queryset(self):
        query_set = super(PostOnlyManager, self).get_queryset()
        drafts = Draft.objects.all().only("id")
        return query_set.exclude(id__in=[draft.id for draft in drafts])

class Post(models.Model):
    objects = PostOnlyManager()

class Draft(Post):
    objects = models.Manager()

With this solution, we do two requests at each access. Plus, it's necessary to know every sub class we want to exclude. We have to keep the BaseManager for all subclasses. You can note the use of only method to limit the query and de serialization to minimum required.

Solution 2 : With altering base class

The solution here is to add a field called type that will be filtered in the query set. It's the recommended one in the Django documentation.

class PostOnlyManager(models.Manager):
    def get_query_set(self):
        return super(PostOnlyManager, self).get_queryset().filter(post_type='P')

class Post(models.Model):
    objects = PostOnlyManager()
    post_type = models.CharField(max_length=1, default='P')

class Draft(Post):
    objects = models.Manager()

@receiver(pre_save, sender=Draft)
def pre_save_draft_signal(sender, **kwargs):
    kwargs['instance'].post_type = 'D'

The problem here is the add of one field which increase database size, but filtering is easier and is done in the initial query. Plus, it's more flexible with many classes. I used a signal to setup post_type value, didn't found a better solution for now.

Conclusion

Depending on your constraints you can use the solution 1 or 2. These solutions can also be extended to a more complex filtering mechanism by dividing your class tree in different families.

Saturday, 04 June 2016
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Logo Dynastie

Cela faisait longtemps que Dynastie n'avait plus eu droit à son petit article. C'est donc la version 0.4 qui sort aujourd'hui avec quelques fonctionnalités intéressantes :

  • Possibilité d'inclure un article dans un autre article (les modifications sont automatiquement reportées lors de la re génération). Pratique quand on écrit une fiche sur un groupe par exemple (un article général qui référence chaque sous article)
  • Filtre fail2ban
  • Support de Django 1.8
  • Coloration de code avec la syntaxe Markdown
  • Redirection sur le commentaire écrit (lors de son ajout)
  • Meilleure gestion du cache lors de la génération des articles

Plus deux/trois détails et quelques bugs corrigés. Il y a encore un peu de boulot, mais cette version est un bon cru !

Thursday, 14 April 2016
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

Capture d'écran IWLA

Bientôt un an depuis la version précédente d'IWLA (mon analyseurs de statistiques web écrit en Python) et, sans m'en rendre compte, il y a des tas de nouveautés ! Au menu:

  • Mise en lumière des différences (par rapport à la dernière analyse) pour les mots clés ainsi que les fichiers téléchargés
  • Rappel du résumé annuel dans les statistiques mensuelles
  • Ajout de la durée de l'analyse
  • Détection des navigateurs
  • Détection des systèmes d'exploitations
  • Détection des pays (grâce à iptogeo)
  • Détection des clientS RSS
  • Statistiques détaillées pour un/des visiteur(s) particuliers
  • Possibilité de mettre à jour des configurationS par rapport à celles par défauts (sans écrasement) avec le suffixe "_append"
  • Statistiques par heures
  • Possibilité de spécifier plusieurs fichiers à analyser
  • Support des fichiers compressés (.gz)
  • Possibilité de ne pas compresser la base de données (option -z)
  • Possibilité de spécifier ses propres moteurs de recherche
  • Requêtes DNS inversés pour les clientS RSS

Quelques bugs ont été corrigés :

  • Le dernier jour du mois n'était pas analysé
  • Les pages accédées à la même seconde n'étaient pas analysées

Comme quoi, un logiciel "stable" n'existe pas. Je suis plutôt content de cette version qui est vraiment complète et avec des fonctionnalités non présentes dans AWStats ! Cela tient surtout en la modularité de l'architecture qui, certes, réduit un peu les performances, mais offre une grande souplesse dans l'écriture de modules (filtres).

Thursday, 03 March 2016
|
Écrit par
Grégory Soutadé

IPToGeo

Voici la première version d'IPToGeo. Il s'agit d'un double service (serveur et ligne de commande), qui permet de récupérer l'assignation géographique (code pays ISO) d'une adresse IP. Je parle ici d'assignation, car, même si dans 90% des cas, la localisation du fournisseur est la même que celle de l'utilisateur, il reste 10% où ce n'est pas vrai. Par exemple, un fournisseur de service VPN peut avoir des utilisateurs dans le monde entier, donc les utilisateurs finaux ne seront pas ceux de l'adresse remontée dans le journal. Pour avoir une géolocalisation précise, il faudra se tourner vers d'autres services qui ont des bases de données beaucoup plus fines.

Pour se faire, IPToGeo va récupérer les données des 5 RIR (Regional Internet Registries) : AfriNIC, APNIC, ARIN, LACNIC et RIPE NCC et les compiler en données statiques pour fournir une base de données sous forme d'un arbre non équilibré (pour le langage C). Le but est d'utiliser le moins de ressources possible et d'avoir une très forte réactivité.

La partie serveur est écrite en C, les données sont générées à partir d'un script Python. Les tests sont eux aussi en Python (une classe haut niveau est fournie). Afin d'améliorer encore la sécurité, il y a un support (optionnel) de seccomp. Les adresses IPv4 et IPv6 sont supportées.

Pourquoi iptogeo alors qu'il existe déjà des bases de données gratuites (notamment celle de Maxmind) ? Tout d'abord pour des raisons de confidentialités. Faire une requête sur une IP pour obtenir une position géographique est une source d'information pour celui qui écoute le trafic réseau. Ensuite, parce que c'est simple : la compilation des données et la recherche a demandé peu de travail (de plus, les données sont fournies gratuitement et mises à jour quotidiennement). Ce projet m'a permis de poser les bases d'un serveur optimisé, sécurisé (via seccomp) et qui écoute aussi bien en IPv4 qu'en IPv6. Finalement, parce que la recherche telle qu'implémenté nativement dans AWStats, et qui se base sur l'extension du DNS inversé est mauvaise (impossible de déterminer la position d'un .com grâce à son extension). En effet, le but de la classe Python est du test, mais aussi et surtout pour être intégrée à iwla.

Comme d'habitude, les sources sont disponibles sous licence GPLv3 dans ma forge inDefero.

IPv6

Petit aparté sur IPv6. Naïvement, je pensais qu'IPv6, c'était comme IPv4 avec des adresses plus longues, du coup il était idiot de ne pas migrer, surtout que l'on prédit sans cesse l'épuisement des adresses IPv4 au niveau mondial. Au lieu de réaliser cette migration, les opérateurs réseaux utilisent des techniques plus ou moins louches pour pallier à ce problème (NAT, double NAT, adresses privées...).

Pour rappel, IPv4 est un système d'adressage qui date de janvier 1980, on est donc au début de l'informatique moderne. À ses 18/19 ans, la norme IPv6 a été finalisée par l'IETF. Norme qui a aujourd'hui elle-même 18 ans. 1998, c'est le tout tout début du haut débit en France, le bas débit ayant déjà bien vécu et une solide expérience dans un réseau mondial appelé Internet ayant été acquise par l'IETF.

La norme IPv6 a donc été définie, non pas seulement pour augmenter la taille des adresses IP, mais aussi pour corriger tout un tas de défauts d'IPv4. Les deux normes doivent cohabiter : d'un côté, une norme archaïquerudimentaire, et de l'autre une super norme qui se révèle pourtant beaucoup plus complexe.

C'est cette question de complexité qui fait toute la différence. Tout le monde est capable de comprendre rapidement les mécanismes IPv4 (en plus de pouvoir retenir plus ou moins facilement une adresse de tête). L'administration y est simple, même si la puissance de calcul des routeurs doit être plus importante. C'est ce qui fait sa force (en plus d'être déjà en place depuis des années) là où IPv6 amène plein de nouveaux concepts nécessitant d'adapter tous les étages du réseau (matériel, administration, logiciel...) : auto-configuration, adresse privée + adresse publique, renouvellement d'adresse...

D'un point de vue technique, IPv6 est pourtant implémenté dans les équipements depuis des années. Linux facilite lui aussi la migration en faisant une correspondance automatique IPv6 -> IPv4 pour les serveurs qui n'écoutent qu'en v4. Néanmoins, basculer le réseau mondial en IPv6, c'est potentiellement priver les utilisateurs de réseau à cause d'une mauvaise configuration (qui va assurer le support ?). Risque trop important dans un monde qui se veut "tout connecté". La transition se fait donc extrêmement lentement (tout le monde freine le plus possible) via des services comme des tunnels (6rd) ou encore l'implémentation de double pile au niveau des boxs. Paradoxalement, ces solutions de migrations sont finalement plus complexes à mettre en œuvre que l'IPv6 natif !